Highlights from Orchids (James O’Brien)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from James O’Brien’s Orchids (1911).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Orchids

[…] common sense is one of the most important factors in cultivation[.]

[…] “practice makes master.” 

The first tropical Orchid to flower in the British Isles appears to have been Bletia verecunda (Helleborine americana), figured in Historia Plantorum Rariorum, 1728–1735.

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Highlights from Our Cats (Harrison Weir)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from Harrison Weir’s Our Cats (1889).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Our Cats

[…] in buying a white cat—or, in fact, any other—ascertain for a certainty that it is not deaf. 

It is stated that if a dog has white anywhere, he is sure to have a white tip to his tail […].

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The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate (Peter Wohlleben)

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate

In The Hidden Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben shares his deep love of woods and forests and explains the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in the woodland and the amazing scientific processes behind the wonders of which we are blissfully unaware. Much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. Continue reading…