Highlights from Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice (Lysander Spooner)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from Lysander Spooner’s Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice (1882).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice

[…] all legislation whatsoever is an absurdity, a usurpation, and a crime. 

[The science of justice] is the science which alone can tell any man what he can, and cannot, do; what he can, and cannot, have; what he can, and cannot, say, without infringing the rights of any other person. 

[…] each man shall do, towards every other, all that justice requires him to do; as, for example, that he shall pay his debts, that he shall return borrowed or stolen property to its owner, and that he shall make reparation for any injury he may have done […].

Continue reading…

The Illustrated Guide to Criminal Law (Nathaniel Burney)

The Illustrated Guide to Criminal Law: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

The Illustrated Guide to Criminal Law

“‘An undercover has to tell you if he’s a cop. Otherwise it’s entrapment, right?’

Wrong! That’s just one of many popular myths about criminal law that get repeated on street corners, in locker rooms, and on websites every day—all of them wrong.

Based on his popular Illustrated Guide to Law webcomic series, Nathaniel Burney debunks all of those myths and teaches everything you never learned about the law. Not just what the law is, but why it’s like that and how it works. Continue reading…

The Whistler (John Grisham)

The Whistler: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

The Whistler

“A high-stakes thrill ride through the darkest corners of the Sunshine State, from the author hailed as ‘the best thriller writer alive’ by Ken Follett.

We expect our judges to be honest and wise. Their integrity is the bedrock of the entire judicial system. We trust them to ensure fair trials, to protect the rights of all litigants, to punish those who do wrong, and to oversee the flow of justice. But what happens when a judge bends the law or takes a bribe? Continue reading…

Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice (Lysander Spooner)

Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice

“‘The science of mine and thine—the science of justice—is the science of all human rights; of all a man’s rights of person and property; of all his rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is the science which alone can tell any man what he can, and cannot, do; what he can, and cannot, have; what he can, and cannot, say, without infringing the rights of any other person.

It is the science of peace; and the only science of peace; since it is the science which alone can tell us on what conditions mankind can live in peace, or ought to live in peace, with each other. Continue reading…

A Theory of Justice (John Rawls)

A Theory of Justice: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

A Theory of Justice

“Since it appeared in 1971, John Rawls’s A Theory of Justice has become a classic. The author has now revised the original edition to clear up a number of difficulties he and others have found in the original book.

Rawls aims to express an essential part of the common core of the democratic tradition—justice as fairness—and to provide an alternative to utilitarianism, which had dominated the Anglo-Saxon tradition of political thought since the nineteenth century. Rawls substitutes the ideal of the social contract as a more satisfactory account of the basic rights and liberties of citizens as free and equal persons. Continue reading…