Mrs. Fletcher (Tom Perrotta)

Mrs. Fletcher: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

Mrs. Fletcher

“From the bestselling author of The Leftovers and Little Children comes a penetrating and hilarious new novel about sex, love, and identity on the frontlines of America’s culture wars.

Eve Fletcher is trying to figure out what comes next. A forty-six-year-old divorcee whose beloved only child has just left for college, Eve is struggling to adjust to her empty nest when one night her phone lights up with a text message. Sent from an anonymous number, the mysterious sender tells Eve, “U R my MILF!” Over the months that follow, that message comes to obsess Eve. Continue reading…

A__hole: How I Got Rich and Happy by Not Giving a Damn About Anyone and How You Can, Too (Martin Kihn)

A__hole: How I Got Rich and Happy by Not Giving a Damn About Anyone and How You Can, Too: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

A__hole: How I Got Rich and Happy by Not Giving a Damn About Anyone and How You Can, Too

“Tired of being walked all over? When the waiter brings you something you didn’t order, do you assume he knows best? Are you ready to demand the respect you deserve?

Martin Kihn doesn’t care what your answers are, because of course you need this book. Watch and learn as this one-time softy transforms himself into a lean, mean a-hole machine.”

New Books Playground says: A__hole: How I Got Rich and Happy by Not Giving a Damn About Anyone and How You Can, Too did not teach us much but it has been really funny. Continue reading…

Pygmalion (George Bernard Shaw)

Pygmalion: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

Pygmalion

Pygmalion is a play by George Bernard Shaw, named after a Greek mythological character. It was first presented on stage to the public in 1912. Professor of phonetics Henry Higgins makes a bet that he can train a bedraggled Cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, to pass for a duchess at an ambassador’s garden party by teaching her to assume a veneer of gentility, the most important element of which, he believes, is impeccable speech. The play is a sharp lampoon of the rigid British class system of the day and a commentary on women’s independence. Continue reading…