Highlights from Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice (Lysander Spooner)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from Lysander Spooner’s Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice (1882).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice

[…] all legislation whatsoever is an absurdity, a usurpation, and a crime. 

[The science of justice] is the science which alone can tell any man what he can, and cannot, do; what he can, and cannot, have; what he can, and cannot, say, without infringing the rights of any other person. 

[…] each man shall do, towards every other, all that justice requires him to do; as, for example, that he shall pay his debts, that he shall return borrowed or stolen property to its owner, and that he shall make reparation for any injury he may have done […].

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How to Lie with Statistics (Darrell Huff)

How to Lie with Statistics: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

How to Lie with Statistics

“‘There is terror in numbers,’ writes Darrell Huff in How to Lie with Statistics. And nowhere does this terror translate to blind acceptance of authority more than in the slippery world of averages, correlations, graphs, and trends. Huff sought to break through ‘the daze that follows the collision of statistics with the human mind’ with this slim volume, first published in 1954. The book remains relevant as a wake-up call for people unaccustomed to examining the endless flow of numbers pouring from Wall Street, Madison Avenue, and everywhere else someone has an axe to grind, a point to prove, or a product to sell. Continue reading…

Highlights from The Communist Manifesto (Karl Marx & Friedrich Engels)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from Karl Marx’s and Friedrich Engels’s The Communist Manifesto (1848).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

The Communist Manifesto

The history of all hitherto existing societies is the history of class struggles. 

In the earlier epochs of history, we find almost everywhere a complicated arrangement of society into various orders, a manifold gradation of social rank. 

Society as a whole is more and more splitting up into two great hostile camps, into two great classes, directly facing each other: Bourgeoisie and Proletariat. 

The executive of the modern State is but a committee for managing the common affairs of the whole bourgeoisie. 

[Free trade:] In one word, for exploitation, veiled by religious and political illusions, naked, shameless, direct, brutal exploitation. 

The bourgeoisie has stripped of its halo every occupation hitherto honoured and looked up to with reverent awe.

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The Power of Charm: How to Win Anyone Over in Any Situation (Brian Tracy & Ron Arden)

The Power of Charm: How to Win Anyone Over in Any Situation: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

The Power of Charm: How to Win Anyone Over in Any Situation

“As one of the world’s premier business consultants and personal success experts, Brian Tracy has devoted his life to helping others achieve things they never dreamed possible. Now, in his latest book, he gives readers the key they need to open any door… and get whatever they want, every time. The Power of Charm gives readers proven ways to become more captivating—and persuasive—in any situation. With his trademark directness, Tracy shows readers what charm can do, and how they can use simple methods to immediately become more charming and dramatically improve their social lives and business relationships. Continue reading…

A Technique for Producing Ideas (James Webb Young)

A Technique for Producing Ideas: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

A Technique for Producing Ideas

“This is the original version of Young’s seminal work on creativity. It offers practical advice on idea creation from an advertising industry icon who was inducted into the American Advertising Federation Hall of Fame, and served as the First Chairman of The Ad Council. It examines the creative process and ways to produce ideas for everyone from copywriters to artists.

This version has been custom-formatted for Kindle and checked for typos. It includes an interactive table of contents.”

New Books Playground says: A Technique for Producing Ideas introduced us to some nice little ideas to generate: more ideas. Continue reading…

For Single People Who Still Understand The Value of Relationships (Rob Hill Sr.)

For Single People Who Still Understand The Value of Relationships: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

For Single People Who Still Understand The Value of Relationships

“‘For Single People Who Still Understand the Value of Relationships’ is everything that it appears to be. This book gives vital insight on the different dynamics of relationships and love in an uncanny fashion. Relationship expert, Rob Hill, is setting a new standard for singles, new couples, as well as seasoned lovers. Not only will they value relationships more, they’ll have a better understanding of what it takes to date, relate, and grow as individuals to better their chances of finding, enjoying, and sustaining a healthy relationship in today’s times. Continue reading…

The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind (Gustave Le Bon)

The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind

The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind (French: Psychologie des Foules; literally: Psychology of Crowds) is a book authored by Gustave Le Bon that was first published in 1895.

In the book, Le Bon claims that there are several characteristics of crowd psychology: ‘impulsiveness, irritability, incapacity to reason, the absence of judgement of the critical spirit, the exaggeration of sentiments, and others…’ Le Bon claimed that ‘an individual immersed for some length of time in a crowd soon finds himself—either in consequence of magnetic influence given out by the crowd or from some other cause of which we are ignorant—in a special state, which much resembles the state of fascination in which the hypnotized individual finds himself in the hands of the hypnotizer.’”

Wikipedia. Continue reading…

Highlights from Orchids (James O’Brien)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from James O’Brien’s Orchids (1911).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Orchids

[…] common sense is one of the most important factors in cultivation[.]

[…] “practice makes master.” 

The first tropical Orchid to flower in the British Isles appears to have been Bletia verecunda (Helleborine americana), figured in Historia Plantorum Rariorum, 1728–1735.

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What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy (Thomas Nagel)

What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy: Learn more at Amazon or at Goodreads.

What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy

“In this cogent and accessible introduction to philosophy, the distinguished author of Mortal Questions and The View From Nowhere sets forth the central problems of philosophical inquiry for the beginning student. Arguing that the best way to learn about philosophy is to think about its questions directly, Thomas Nagel considers possible solutions to nine problems—knowledge of the world beyond our minds, knowledge of other minds, the mind-body problem, free will, the basis of morality, right and wrong, the nature of death, the meaning of life, and the meaning of words. Continue reading…

Why Don’t We Learn from History? (B.H. Liddell Hart)

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Why Don’t We Learn from History?

“A concise exposition of the fallacies of history, the conflict between history and propaganda, what it means to us, and what we may look forward to.”

New Books Playground says: Why Don’t We Learn from History? has taught us a lot more about what humans do and what we need to keep in mind when looking at history. Continue reading…