Highlights from Thoughts Are Things (William Walker Atkinson)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from William Walker Atkinson’s Thoughts Are Things (1889).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Thoughts Are Things

The first reading of this book will serve as but a mere “taste” of its contents.

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Highlights from The Elements of Style (William Strunk Jr.)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from William Strunk Jr.’s The Elements of Style (1920).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Elementary Rules of Usage

The Elements of Style

1. Form the possessive singular of nouns by adding ’s.

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Highlights from Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice (Lysander Spooner)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from Lysander Spooner’s Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice (1882).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Natural Law: Or The Science of Justice

[…] all legislation whatsoever is an absurdity, a usurpation, and a crime.

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Highlights from The Communist Manifesto (Karl Marx & Friedrich Engels)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from Karl Marx’s and Friedrich Engels’s The Communist Manifesto (1848).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

The Communist Manifesto

The history of all hitherto existing societies is the history of class struggles.

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Highlights from Orchids (James O’Brien)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from James O’Brien’s Orchids (1911).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Orchids

[…] common sense is one of the most important factors in cultivation[.]

[…] “practice makes master.”

The first tropical Orchid to flower in the British Isles appears to have been Bletia verecunda (Helleborine americana), figured in Historia Plantorum Rariorum, 1728–1735.

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Highlights from Our Cats (Harrison Weir)

From our journey through random or quality (or random quality) books, here are some highlights from Harrison Weir’s Our Cats (1889).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

Our Cats

[…] in buying a white cat—or, in fact, any other—ascertain for a certainty that it is not deaf.

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Highlights from The Symbolism of Freemasonry (Albert G. Mackey)

Establishing our new series, here are some highlights from Albert G. Mackey’s The Symbolism of Freemasonry (1882).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

The Symbolism of Freemasonry

“One of the most remarkable phenomena of the human race is the universal existence of religious ideas—a belief in something supernatural and divine, and a worship corresponding to it.”—Gross

[…] we find, soon after the cataclysm, the immediate descendants of Noah in the possession of at least two religious truths […].

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Highlights from The Jewish State (Theodor Herzl)

Taking over the meiert​.com series, here are some snippets and highlights from Theodor Herzl’s The Jewish State (1896).

Emphasis as it appears in the original work may be missing, and our own edits, though marked, may be broad. Important: By sharing these highlights we neither endorse nor recommend respective authors and their views. Assume that we know little of the authors, and that we have nuanced views on the matter—as with all our book recommendations.

The Jewish State

[…] the childish error that commodities pass from hand to hand in continuous rotation.

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